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Anglo-Nepalese War
Oct 18, '21
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Anglo-Nepalese War

The Anglo-Nepalese War (1 November 1814 – 4 March 1816), also known as the Gorkha War, was fought between the Gorkhali army of the Kingdom of Nepal (present-day Nepal) and the British forces of the East India Company (EIC, present-day India). Both sides had ambitious expansion plans for the mountainous north of the Indian subcontinent. The war ended with the signing of the Treaty of Sugauli in 1816 AD, which ceded some Nepalese controlled territory to the EIC.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Nepalese_War




Bam Shah

Sri Chautaria Bam Shah or Brahma Shah was an administrator of Nepal. He belongs to Shah Dynasty of Gorkha. He was Governor of Kumaun Province during Anglo-Nepalese war.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bam_Shah




Battle of Nalapani

The Battle of Nalapani was the first battle of Anglo-Nepalese War. The battle took place around the Nalapani fort, near Dehradun, which was placed under siege by the British between 31 October and 30 November 1814. The fort's garrison was commanded by Captain Balbhadra Kunwar, while Major-General Rollo Gillespie, who had previously fought at the Battle of Java, was in charge of the attacking British troops. Gillespie was killed on the first day of the siege while rallying his men and despite considerable odds, both in terms of numbers and firepower, Balbhadra and his 600-strong garrison, which also consisted of brave women who reportedly shielded the bullets and cannonballs with their bodies, successfully held out against more than 5,000 British troops for over a month.

Fraser recorded the situation in the following terms:

The determined resolution of the small party which held this small post for more than a month, against so comparatively large a force, must surely wring admiration from every voice, especially when the horrors of the latter portion of this time are considered; the dismal spectacle of their slaughtered comrades, the sufferings of their women and children thus immured with themselves, and the hopelessness of relief, which destroyed any other motive for their obstinate defence they made, than that resulting from a high sense of duty, supported by unsubdued courage. This, and a generous spirit of courtesy towards their enemy, certainly marked the character of the garrison of Kalunga, during the period of its siege.

Whatever the nature of the Ghoorkhas may have been found in other quarters, there was here no cruelty to wounded or to prisoners; no poisoned arrows were used; no wells or waters were poisoned; no rancorous spirit of revenge seemed to animate them: they fought us in fair conflict, like men; and, in intervals of actual combat, showed us a liberal courtesy worthy of a more enlightened people.

So far from insulting the bodies of the dead and wounded, they permitted them to lie untouched, till carried away; and none were stripped, as is too universally the case.

After two costly and unsuccessful attempts to seize the fort by direct attack, the British changed their approach and sought to force the garrison to surrender by cutting off the fort's external water supply. Having suffered three days of thirst, on the last day of the siege, Balbhadra, refusing to surrender, led the 70 surviving members of the garrison in a charge against the besieging force. Fighting their way out of the fort, the survivors escaped into the nearby hills. Considering the time, effort, and resources spent to capture the small fort, it was a pyrrhic victory for the British. A number of later engagements, including one at Jaithak, unfolded in a similar way; but more than any other battle of the war, the fighting around Nalapani established the Gurkhas' reputation as warriors. As a result, they were later recruited by the British to serve in their army.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Nalapani




Girvan Yuddha Bikram Shah

Girvan Yuddha Bikram Shah (Nepali: गीर्वाणयुद्ध विक्रम शाह) (19 October 1797 – 20 November 1816), also called Girvanyuddha Bikrama Shah, was fourth King of Nepal from 1799 to 1816. Although he was not the legitimate heir to the throne his father made him the heir for being the son of his favourite wife Kantavati Devi.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girvan_Yuddha_Bikram_Shah




Conduct during battle of Nalapani

During the fighting, the British were impressed by the conduct of the Nepalese soldiers during the battle who, according to British accounts, exhibited fair conduct towards them. This endeared them to the British, who were willing to reciprocate by giving medical aid to wounded and captured Nepalese. The confidence the Nepalese exhibited in the British officers was significant: they not only accepted, but also solicited surgical aid, even while continuing to fight. This gave rise, on one occasion, to a scene, which was recounted by the Scottish traveller James Baillie Fraser:

While the batteries were playing, a man was perceived on the breach, advancing and waving his hand. The guns ceased firing for a while, and the man came into the batteries: he proved to be a Ghoorkha, whose lower jaw had been shattered by a cannon shot, and who came thus frankly to solicit assistance from his enemy.

It is unnecessary to add, that it was instantly afforded. He recovered; and, when discharged from the hospital, signified his desired to return to his corps to combat us again: exhibiting thus, through the whole, a strong sense of the value of generosity and courtesy in warfare, and also of his duty to his country, – separating completely in his own mind private and national feelings from each other, – and his frank confidence in the individuals of our nation, from the duty he owed his own, to fight against us collectively.

Legacy

The fighting around Nalapani, more than any other battle, established the reputation of the Gurkhas as warriors, and won the admiration of the British. Gillespie had been killed and Balbhadra and his 600 men had held the might of the British and their native Indian troops for a month. Even with only 70 remaining survivors after his water source had been cut off, Balbhadra had refused to surrender, and instead had charged out and successfully fought his way through the siege. It set the tone for the rest of the campaign.

Fraser recorded the situation in the following terms:

The determined resolution of the small party which held this small post for more than a month, against so comparatively large a force, must surely wring admiration from every voice, especially when the horrors of the latter portion of this time are considered; the dismal spectacle of their slaughtered comrades, the sufferings of their women and children thus immured with themselves, and the hopelessness of relief, which destroyed any other motive for their obstinate defence they made, than that resulting from a high sense of duty, supported by unsubdued courage. This, and a generous spirit of courtesy towards their enemy, certainly marked the character of the garrison of Kalunga, during the period of its siege.

Whatever the nature of the Ghoorkhas may have been found in other quarters, there was here no cruelty to wounded or to prisoners; no poisoned arrows were used; no wells or waters were poisoned; no rancorous spirit of revenge seemed to animate them: they fought us in fair conflict, like men; and, in intervals of actual combat, showed us a liberal courtesy worthy of a more enlightened people.

So far from insulting the bodies of the dead and wounded, they permitted them to lie untouched, till carried away; and none were stripped, as is too universally the case.

The battle also had significant political repercussions, shaking the British Army's confidence. The fact that the siege had taken so long exposed the British forces' vulnerabilities and encouraged the native Indian states – in particular the old Maratha Confederacy in central India – to continue their resistance against British imperialism in the hope that they could still be defeated.

In the years following the battle, the British constructed two small obelisks that still stand in Nalapani. One was laid in honour of Gillespie, while another was dedicated with the inscription "Our brave adversary Bul Buddur and his gallant men". In Nepal, the story of the battle at Nalapani has gained a legendary status and has become an important part of the nation's historical narrative, while Balbhadra himself has become a national hero. The fighting spirit displayed by the Nepalese in this and other following battles of Anglo-Nepalese War ultimately led to the recruitment of Gurkhas into the British Army.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Nalapani




Gurkha

The Gurkhas or Gorkhas (/ˈɡɜːrkə, ˈɡʊər-/), with endonym Gorkhali (Nepali: गोरखाली, [ɡorkʰali]), are soldiers native to South Asia of Nepalese nationality and Indian Gorkha ethnicity recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping forces and in war zones around the world. Historically, the terms "Gurkha" and "Gorkhali" were synonymous with "Nepali", which originates from the hill principality Gorkha Kingdom, from which the Kingdom of Nepal expanded under Prithivi Narayan Shah. The name may be traced to the medieval Hindu warrior-saint Guru Gorakhnath[3] who has a historic shrine in Gorkha District. The word itself derived from Go-Raksha (Nepali: गोरक्षा i.e., 'Protector(रक्षा) of cows(गो')), raksha becoming rakha (रखा). Rakhawala means 'protector' and is derived from raksha as well.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurkha




Kukri

The kukri (English: /ˈkʊkri/) or khukuri (Nepali: खुकुरी, pronounced [kʰukuri]) is a type of machete originating from the Indian subcontinent, and is traditionally associated with the Nepali-speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India. The knife has a distinct recurve in its blade. It serves multiple purposes as a melee weapon and also as a regular cutting tool throughout most of South Asia. The blade has traditionally served the role of a basic utility knife for the Gurkhas. The kukri is the national weapon of Nepal, and consequently is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army. The kukri also sees standard service with various regiments and units within the Indian Army, such as the Assam Rifles, the Kumaon Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles and the various Gorkha regiments. Outside of its native region of South Asia, the kukri also sees service with the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army—a unique regiment that is quite different from the rest of the British Army as it is the only regiment that recruits its soldiers strictly from Nepal; a relationship that has its roots in the times of British colonial rule in India. The kukri is the staple weapon of all Gurkha military regiments and units throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife". The kukri often appears in Nepalese and Indian Gorkha heraldry and is used in many traditional, Hindu-centric rites such as wedding ceremonies.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kukri
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mES3j-SR00A


Present Day


Royal Gurkha Rifles

The Royal Gurkha Rifles (RGR) is a rifle regiment of the British Army, forming part of the Brigade of Gurkhas. Unlike other regiments in the British Army, RGR soldiers are recruited from Nepal, which is neither a dependent territory of the United Kingdom nor a member of the Commonwealth.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Gurkha_Rifles

Garrison/HQ

RHQ – Camberley

1st Battalion — Shorncliffe

2nd Battalion — Seria, Brunei

3rd Battalion — Aldershot Garrison






Shorncliffe Army Camp

Shorncliffe Army Camp is a large military camp near Cheriton in Kent. Established in 1794, it later served as a staging post for troops destined for the Western Front during the First World War.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shorncliffe_Army_Camp




Shorncliffe Redoubt

Shorncliffe Redoubt is a British Napoleonic earthwork fort. The site is approximately 300 feet by 300 feet and is situated on the Kentish Coast in Sandgate, Kent.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shorncliffe_Redoubt




Cheriton, Kent

Cheriton is a northern suburb of Folkestone in Kent. It is the location of the English terminal of the Channel Tunnel as well as of the major army barracks of Shorncliffe Camp.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheriton,_Kent




Dymchurch Redoubt

Dymchurch Grand Redoubt is a fortification at Palmarsh on the coast of Kent in England, built during the Napoleonic War as part of a large defensive scheme to protect the country from an expected French invasion.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymchurch_Redoubt

Frequency and Resonance


Dr Ian Charles Baillie

Ian was born or rather entered the physical atomic matrix in Folkestone, Kent, a small ferry and fishing port on the south east coast of England at 12:09 p.m. June 4, 1954. He was extremely lucky to have an independent thinker for a father and an energetic, exuberant mother. Although not wealthy in the monetary sense, they allowed him freedom to experiment and be himself.

Since 1992 I have live in Hythe above the famous Rifle ranges and our house sits on the site of the Small Arms School, Barrack Hill.


Royal Gurkha Rifles

The first battalion (1 RGR) is based at Shorncliffe, near Folkestone in Kent as part of 16 Air Assault Brigade, and is available for deployment to most areas in Europe and Africa.





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8pIJglsYUE

Many of the Gurkha and their families have assimilated into the community in Cheriton, Folkestone, Hythe, Ashford, Canterbury and Chatham since 2005. Still their core values and make us proud and honoured to have them.

And ......


We make a good curry!


Everest Inn Hythe

Everest Inn Hythe providing award-winning Nepalese and Indian cuisine. Book a Table Booking or Order Online Today.







Everest Inn Hythe is a Nepalese and Indian restaurant based in Hythe, Kent. Our aim is to bring the best in Nepalese and Indian cuisine with a modern twist on traditional method.

We provide a Takeaway service and home delivery as well as excellent dine in restaurant. Over the years Everest Inn have won many awards for the best food, excellent service, and having one of the best head chef’s. Our menu is always being updated with new dishes to make sure our customers are at the forefront.

https://www.everestinnhythe.co.uk/?l=en















Xxxx

Oct 18, '21
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