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Beethoven - Ode to Joy
Nov 19, '21
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Freude schöner Götterfunken





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udOvf8LqLYghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kcOpyM9cBg



O Freunde, nicht diese Töne!

Sondern lasst uns angenehmere anstimmen

und freudenvollere!

Freude, schöner Götterfunken,

Tochter aus Elysium,

Wir betreten feuertrunken.

Himmlische, dein Heiligtum!

Deine Zauber binden wieder

Was die Mode streng geteilt;

Alle Menschen werden Brüder

Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

Wem der große Wurf gelungen

Eines Freundes Freund zu sein,

Wer ein holdes Weib errungen,

Mische seinen Jubel ein!

Ja, wer auch nur eine Seele

Sein nennt auf dem Erdenrund!

Und wer's nie gekonnt, der stehle

Weinend sich aus diesem Bund.

Freude trinken alle Wesen

An den Brüsten der Natur;

Alle Guten, alle Bösen,

Folgen ihrer Rosenspur.

Küsse gab sie uns und Reben,

Einen Freund, geprüft im Tod;

Wollust ward dem Wurm gegeben,

Und der Cherub steht vor Gott!

Froh, wie seine Sonnen fliegen

Durch des Himmels prächt'gen Plan,

Laufet, Brüder, eure Bahn,

Freudig, wie ein Held zum Siegen.

Seid umschlungen, Millionen.

Dieser Kuss der ganzen Welt!

Brüder! Über'm Sternenzelt

Muss ein lieber Vater wohnen.

Ihr stürzt nieder, Millionen?

Ahnest du den Schöpfer, Welt?

Such ihn über'm Sternenzelt!

Über Sternen muss er wohnen.





Symphony No. 9 (9. Sinfonie)

Choral symphony by Ludwig van Beethoven

O Freunde, nicht diese Töne

Sondern laßt uns angenehmere anstimmen

Und freudenvollere

Freude (Freude), Freude (Freude)

Freude schöner Götterfunken

Tochter aus Elysium

Wir betreten feuertrunken

Himmlische, dein Heiligtum

Deine Zauber binden wieder

Was die Mode streng geteilt

Alle Menschen werden Brüder

Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt

Wem der große Wurf gelungen

Eines Freundes Freund zu sein

Wer ein holdes Weib errungen

Mische seinen Jubel ein

Ja, wer auch nur eine Seele

Sein nennt auf dem Erdenrund

Und wer's nie gekonnt, der stehle

Weinend sich aus diesem Bund

Freude trinken alle Wesen

An den Brüsten der Natur

Alle Guten, alle Bösen

Folgen ihrer Rosenspur

Küsse gab sie uns und Reben

Einen Freund, geprüft im Tod

Wollust ward dem Wurm gegeben

Und der Cherub steht vor Gott

Froh, froh wie seine Sonnen, seine Sonnen fliegen

Froh wie seine Sonnen fliegen

Durch des Himmels prächt'gen Plan

Laufet, Brüder, eure Bahn

Laufet, Brüder, eure Bahn

Freudig, wie ein Held zum Siegen

Wie ein Held zum Siegen

Laufet, Brüder, eure Bahn

(Laufet, Brüder, eure Bahn)

Freudig, wie ein Held zum Siegen

Wie ein Held zum Siegen

Freudig, freudig, freudig wie ein Held zum Siegen

Freude, schöner Götterfunken

Tochter aus Elysium

Wir betreten feuertrunken

Himmlische, dein Heiligtum

Deine Zauber binden wieder

Was die Mode streng geteilt

Alle Menschen werden Brüder

Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt

Seid umschlungen, Millionen

Diesen Kuß der ganzen Welt

Seid umschlungen, Millionen

Diesen Kuß der ganzen Welt

Brüder, über'm Sternenzelt

Muß ein lieber Vater wohnen

Brüder, über'm Sternenzelt

Muß ein lieber Vater wohnen

Ihr stürzt nieder, Millionen?

Ahnest du den Schöpfer, Welt?

Über'm Sternenzelt

Über Sternen muß er wohnen

Songwriters: Ludwig Van Beethoven

Symphony no. 9 in D minor, op. 125: IV. "O Freunde nicht diese Töne"





Symphony No. 9 (9th symphony)

Choral symphony by Ludwig van Beethoven

O friends, not these tones

But let's do something more pleasant

And more joyful

Joy (joy), joy (joy)

Joy, beautiful spark of the gods

Daughter from Elysium

We enter, drunk with fire

Heavenly, your sanctuary

Your spells bind again

What the fashion strictly divided

all people become brothers

Where your gentle wing rests

Who made the big hit

To be a friend's friend

Whoever has won a devoted wife

Mix in his cheers

Yes who even has a soul

His names on the earth

And if you never could, steal

Weeping from this covenant

All beings drink joy

On the breasts of nature

All good, all bad

Follow their rose trail

She gave us kisses and vines

A friend tried in death

pleasure was given to the worm

And the cherub stands before God

Happy, happy as its suns, its suns fly

Happy as its suns fly

By heaven's splendid plan

Run, brothers, your path

Run, brothers, your path

Joyful, like a hero to victory

Like a hero to victory

Run, brothers, your path

(Run, brothers, your path)

Joyful, like a hero to victory

Like a hero to victory

Happy, happy, happy like a hero to victory

Joy, beautiful spark of the gods

Daughter from Elysium

We enter, drunk with fire

Heavenly, your sanctuary

Your spells bind again

What the fashion strictly divided

all people become brothers

Where your gentle wing rests

Be embraced, millions

This kiss for the whole world

Be embraced, millions

This kiss for the whole world

Brothers, over the stars

Must have a dear father

Brothers, over the stars

Must have a dear father

Are you falling down, millions?

Do you sense the Creator, world?

Above the starry sky

He must live above the stars





The remarkable story of Beethoven’s ‘Choral’ Symphony No. 9 and the ‘Ode to Joy’

By the time Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, with its huge 'Ode to Joy' climax, was premiered on 7 May 1824, the composer was profoundly deaf.

Ludwig van Beethoven’s revolutionary Ninth Symphony is, without question, one of the greatest works in classical repertoire.

“The Ninth is the culmination of Beethoven’s genius,” says Classic FM composer and Beethoven expert, John Suchet.

“He uses solo voices in a symphony for the first time, setting the words of Schiller’s poem An die Freude. It is the longest and most complex of all his symphonies, which we may regard it as the pinnacle of his achievement, because it is his last symphony – but he was working on his Tenth when he died.”

For almost 200 years, the famous hymnal theme to this symphony’s finale – the ‘Ode to Joy’ – has symbolised hope, unity and fellowship – across borders and through conflicts.

But there’s a tragic story behind the work.

Beethoven’s ‘Choral’ is arguably the greatest symphony ever composed: the summit of his achievements, a masterful musical celebration of the human race and a massive work that makes all who hear it feel better about life. And yet, Beethoven himself never actually heard it.

The man who had done more than anyone before him to change the way we hear music had become one for whom sounds could no longer exist – and the bitter irony of this was not lost on him.

Despite his deteriorating hearing, though, Beethoven persevered with writing this mammoth symphony. Encouraged, no doubt, by his status as the composer of the moment, he penned a colossal work.

But, when Beethoven conducted its premiere, he was famously unaware of the rapturous response his ninth symphony received. It took one of the musicians to alert him to the cheering audience – and that was only at the end of the second movement.

How did the ‘Ode to Joy’ become the EU Anthem?

Since 1985, Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’ has been the melody used to symbolise the European Union.

Although there are no words in the official anthem, the poem ‘Ode to Joy’ expresses Schiller’s vision of the human race becoming brothers – a vision Beethoven shared.

It was first adopted by the Council of Europe in 1972, before EU leaders took it on just over a decade later.

On the EU’s official website, it says: “In the universal language of music, this anthem expresses the European ideals of freedom, peace and solidarity.”







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