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Government Enquiry 1646
Jan 17, '21
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1646. LETTERS AND JOURNALS.

[FIRST PAPER PRESENTED BY LIEUTENANT-GENERAL BAILLIE TO THE PARLIAMENT OF SCOTLAND.]



Mr LORDS AND GENTLEMEN, In obedience to your command, whereby I wes required to inforrne yow of the conduct of your forces fince my dimiffion at Perth, untill that unhappie day at Kill- fyth, your Lordfhips mall be pleafed to know, that at the accept- ance of my dimiflion, the Honourable Houfe of Parliament de- fyred me to attend their forces untill the coming of thefe appointed to fucceed unto me ; whilk I indeavoured. to vaeffe, and that be- caufe I being fo highlie fcandalized, while I had charge, and ferved the Eftate by commiflion ; if then, ferving as it were at difcretion,

any thing fhould mifcarrie, or fall out amifie, undoubtedlie the afperfions of the malitious, and my fufferings would be doubled. This proved not fatiffaclorie ; and therefore, yielding unto their preffmgs, I wes content to wait upon their fervice a fourtnight ; in which tyme, fuch as they had appointed for the charge, as I imagined, might both be advertifed, and repaire unto them, if dili- gence had been ufed. Immediatelie thereafter the rebells returned from the hills into Logyalmond ; and I, with confent of the Lords and others of the Committee who were then preient, marched to the fouth fide of the Bridge of Earne, hopefull the regiments of Fyfe fhould have joyned with us there. Upon the fecond day thereafter the rebells, having croffed Earne at or about Dinning, prefented themfelves before our quarter, whilk, with confent of thefe were of the Committee, I had caufed fortifie alfe weel as tyme would fuffer, for which the rebells marched up towards the hills ontherighthand. Uponthemorrow,therebellsmarchedintothe [Mills] of Forth ; and I, by advyce of the Committee, brought their forces that night to Lindores, and on the morrow to the hill above Roflie ; where the regiments of Fyfe, for whom the Earle of Crawfurd had ridden to Coupar the night before, did joyne with us. That night, with advyce of thefe of the Committee, we lodged near unto Burghlie. The next day, by their advyce, I marched

and lodged that night betwixt Sauchie and the bridge of Tullibody. Upon the morrow, hearing the rebells had croffed Forth above

8

( ) Baillie gave in his resignation to Parliament on the 4th August 1645, and

the victory gained by Montrose at Kilsyth, was on the 15th of that month.

420f

LETTERS AND JOURNALS. iGlfi.

Stirling, thefe of the Committee then prefent, advyfed we mould crofTe at Stirling ; and a little above the parke, upon the fouth- weft fide thereof, I halted with the five regiments, untill thefe of Fyfe were brought up, hearing the rebells were .marched toward

Killyth. After the upcoming of thefe regiments, the Marquefs of Argyle, Earle of Crawfurd, and Lord Burghlie, and with them, if I miflake not, the Earle of Tullibardin, the Lords Elcho and Bal- carras, with fome others, came up. My Lord Marquefs afked me, What wes next to be done ? I anfwered, The direction (liould come from his Lordfhip, and thefe of the Committee. My Lord demanded what reafon wes for that ? I anfwered, I found myfelf fo flighted in every thing belonging to ane commander-in-chiefie, that for the fbort time I wes to ftay with them, 1 would abfolutely fubmitt to their direction, and follow it. The Marquefs defired me

to explain myfelf, which I did in three particulars, fufficiently known to my Lord Marquefs, and the other Lords and gentlemen then

Prifoners of all forts were

without my knowledge : the traffickers therein receaved paffes from others; andfometymespallingwithintwomylesofme,didneither acquaint me with their bufmefs, nor, at their returne, where, or in what poflure they had left the enemie. Secondlie, While I wes

prefent, others did fometymes undertake the command of the armie. Thirdly, Without either my order or knowledge, fyre wes raifed,

and that deflroyed which might have been ane recompence to fome

good deferver ; for which I could not be anfwerable to the publique.

Which confidered, I fhould in every thing freely give my owne

opinion, but follow the judgement of the Committee, and the rather

becaufe that wes the laft day of my undertaking. From that our

march to the bridge of Denny wes agreed upon, and from that to

the Hollin-bufs, where we lodged that night, fome two myles and

ane halfe from Killfyth ; where the rebells quartered likewife. On

the next morning, the Marquefs came to the head of our quarter,

accompanied with the Lord Burghlie, or fome other, whom of I

doe not weell remember: his Lordfhip enquired of the rebells, who,

prefent.

I told his

Lordfhip,

exchanged

afked, If we notadvancenearerthem? Ianfwered,wewerenearenoughifwe intended not to fight, and that his Lordlhip knew weell enough how roughanduneafieawaythatwastomarchin. MyLordreplyed,we needed not keep the hie-way, hot march over at neareft. I defyred the Earle of Crawfurd and others might be called, who were in

the next tent; who, when they come, confented to our advanceing,

I told him, were ftill att His Killfyth.

Lordfhip

might

weell remember: his Lordfhip enquired of the rebells, who,

prefent.

I told his

Lordfhip,

exchanged

afked, If we notadvancenearerthem? Ianfwered,wewerenearenoughifwe intended not to fight, and that his Lordlhip knew weell enough how roughanduneafieawaythatwastomarchin. MyLordreplyed,we needed not keep the hie-way, hot march over at neareft. I defyred the Earle of Crawfurd and others might be called, who were in

the next tent; who, when they come, confented to our advanceing,

I told him, were ftill att His Killfyth.

Lordf

d with the Lord Burghlie, or fome other, whom of I

doe not weell remember: his Lordfhip enquired of the rebells, who,

prefent.

I told his

Lordfhip,

exchanged

afked, If we notadvancenearerthem? Ianfwered,wewerenearenoughifwe intended not to fight, and that his Lordlhip knew weell enough how roughanduneafieawaythatwastomarchin. MyLordreplyed,we needed not keep the hie-way, hot march over at neareft. I defyred the Earle of Crawfurd and others might be called, who were in

the next tent; who, when they come, confented to our advanceing,

and I marched with the regiments through the corns and over the braes, untill the unpaflihle ground did hold us up. There I im- hatlelled, where I doubt, if on any quarter twenty men on front could either have gone from us or attack us. At the upcoming of the noblemen and others of the Committee, whom I doe not lo weell remember, it wes afked me by the Lords, but by whom in particular I have forgott, If we could not draw up to the hill on our right hand ? I Ihew them I did not conceave that ground to be

good, and that the rebells (if they would) might poflefs themfelves of it before us. Their Lordfliips then defired that fome might be lent to vifite the ground ; which was done. In the mean time, I went with my Lord Elcho and my Lord Burghlie to the right handoftheregiments. Notlongafter,Iwesfentforbytheother noblemen, and I defired the Lord Elcho and Burghlie to goe with

me, conjeclureing they would prefs our removeing ; which at our coming they did, alleadging the advantage might be had of the

enemies from that field, they being, as they fuppofed, allready upon their march weflward. I liked not the motion : I told them, if

the rebells Ihould feek to ingadge us there, I conceaved they fhould have great advantage of us ; farder, if we mould beat them to the hill, it would be unto us no great advantage : But, as I had faid, upon like difputes near unto Methven and the Bridge of Earne, to us the lofs of the day would be the lofs of the kingdome. This was not fatiffaclorie ; and therefore I gathered the voices of fuch of the Committee as were there, namely, the Marquefs Argyle, the Earles of Crawfurd and Tullibardine, the Lords Elcho, Burghlie, and Balcarras ; who the reft were, I remember not ; but all agreed to draw unto the hill except Balcarras. This refolution wes im- mediately followed. The commanded men, with the horfemen, marched before ; the regiment on the right hand, faceing to the right hand, and fo the reft advanced to the hill ; where, I fuppofe, that wes done by me which wes incumbent unto me in all that the fhortnefs of time would fuffer before we were engaged. Where- of, and of what wes done without or againft order, your Honours may be pleafed to confider, by the figure in this other paper. If I wes either the laft in the or the firft in the I leave

fight, flight,

to the teftimony of the Marquefs's officers and Colonell Hume's, anduntoGenerall-MajorHollburne; withwhom,afterthefethree

regiments were broken, I came off on the reare of thefe horfes of the rebells who broke the Earle of Crawfurd.

Thus your Lordfliips have, to my beft remembrance, what vow did require of me, wherby I hope it lhall be evident, that I did nothing of confequence at no time, hot either with the alTent or advyce of thefe members of the Committee of State, whofe advice I wes obliedged to take, and who had power to call me to ane ac- compt for my actions, as likewife to governe the army, whilk they did praclife and make ufe of, even while by commiffion I wes in charge. How dangerous then, (I pray your Honours to conlider,) had it been for me, being without commiffion, to have flighted their advyce and counfell, yea, even though no prejudice Ihould

have followed thereupon ?



SECOND PAPER BY LIEUTENANT-GENERAL BAILLIE.]

MY LORDS AND GENTLEMEN, Being appointed by your Ho- nours, at your lali meeting, that I fliould enlarge my relation con- cerning the advanceing and ingadgeing with the rebells near unto Killfyth, in all the circumflances and pafiages thereof, and of every man's particular behaviour thereintill, in fo farr as I could remem- ber ; vow lhall be pleafed to know, that in my former paper, I Ihew your Honors, that confonne to the refolution of thefe of the Com-

mittee, who were prefent, I fent the commanded mufqueteers to the hill, and deiired Major Halden to be their guide unto ane in- clofure which I pointed out unto him ; he did it. I followed them immediately with my Lord Balcarras and the horfemen, giving order to the foot to follow as I mentioned in firfl I

us, my paper. defyred my Lord Balcarras, that the horfemen might flay near unto the commandit mufqueteers ; which wes done. I advanced my felfe where there flood a number of gentlemen on horfeback, where

I found five ratt mufqueteers, more than ane mufquet-fliott at randomebeforetheirbodie,withoutanyorderfromme. TheEarle

Crawfurd, my Lord Burghlie, and I, galloped over the brae to fee the poflure of the enemie, who were embattelled in the meadow, and fun-

dries of them difbanded, were falling up the glen through the bullies. At our returne to thebraehead, we fand the Marquefs of Argyle, with

fundry others, and we law Major Halden leading up an partie of muf- queteers over the field, and toward a houfe near the glen, without any order from me ; neither did they come off when I lent Colonell Arnot, and thereafter Rootmaller Blair, to Major Halden, for that purpofe : wherefore feeing the rebells fall up ilrong, I defired them to reteire, and the officers to goe to their charge. My Lord Balcarras and I galloped back to the regiments. He aiked me what he ihould doe ? I delired him to draw up his regiment on the right hand of the Earle Lauderdale's. I gave order to Lau- derdale's, both by myfelfe and my adjutant, to face to the right hand, and to march to the foot of the hill, then to face as they were ; to Hume to follow their flepps, halt when they halted, and keep diflance and front with them. The Marquefs his Major, as I went toward him, afked what he Ihould doe ? I told him, he fliould draw up on Hume's left hand, as he had done before. I had not ridden farr from him, when looking back, I find Hume had left the way I had put him in, and wes gone at a trott, right weft, in among the dykes and toward the enemy. I followed alfe fad as I could ryde, and meeting the Adjutant on the way, defired him he fliould bring up the Earle Crawfurd's regiment to Lauder- dale's left hand, and caufe the Generall-Major Leflie draw up the regiments of Fyfe in referve as of before : but before I could come to Hume, he and the other two regiments, to wit, the Marquefs of Argyle's, and the three that were joyned in one, had taken in ane inclofure, from whilk (the enemy being fo near) it wes impoffible to bring them off. I rode down on the reere, and

returned on their front. The rebells foot, be this tyme, were ap- proached to the next dyk-e, on whom our mufqueteers made more fire than I could have wifhed ; and therefore did I what I could, with the affiftance of fuch of the officers as were known unto me, to make them fpare their fhott till the enemy fhould be at an nearer diftance, and to keep up the mufqueteers with their picks

and collors

;

but to no In great purpofe.

end,

the rebells

leapt

over the dyk-e and with downe heads fell on and broke thefe

regiments. The prefent officers whom I remember, were Hume,

his Lieutenant-Collonell and major of the Marquefs's regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, and Major Menzies, Glencairne's

fergeant-major, and Caffills's Lieutenant-Collonell, with fundry others, who behaved themfelves weell, and whom of I faw none carefull to fave themfelves before the routing of the regiments. Thereafter I rode to the brae, where I found Generall-Major Holl- burne alone, who fhew me a fquadron of the rebells horfemen, who had gone by and charged the horfemen with Lieutenant-Col- lonell Murray, and, as I fuppofed, did afterward rowt the Earle of Crawfurd, and thefe with him ; Hollburne and I galloped through the inclofures to have found the referve ; hot before we could come at them, they were in the flight. At the brook, that not long be- fore we had eroded, we overtook Major Inglifh of Ingliftoune,

Captain Maitland, and fome other officers of the Fyfe regiments, who with me indeavoured to make our people ftand, and maintaine that pafTe; hot all in vaine. Thereafter we rode off together till we paft the Bridge of Denny ; where we parted, and Hollburne and I went to Stirling, where, in prefence of the Earle Tullibar- dine and the Lord Burghlie, I dealt with the horfemen that were there, to have gone with me to Clidfdale ; but loft my labour ; for they finding the bridge {hut, crofled the river at the foord of Dripp, except the officers, who thereafter went in with us into the towne ; where, by advyce of the Earle of Crawfurd, the other Lords and gentlemen that were there, the beft courl'e wes taken

that might be for that tyrne, for fecureing that towne and caftell.

It is objected againft me only, as if no other officer were to

give an accompt, neither for regiment, company, nor corporalfhip, that on this our unhappie day there were no lighted lunts among

the niufquetrie ? The fire given by the firft five regiments will fufficiently anfwer what concerns them ; and for the other three, I humbly intreat your Honours to inform yourfelves of Generall- Major Leflie, the Adjutant, and the chief officers of thefe feverall regiments : if they doe not fatiffie yow therein, then I mall anfwer for myfelfe. Secondly, it is alleadged we fliould have marched from the one ground to the other in battell : which wes impoflible, in regard of the ground, and our large front ; neither could we have marched with fingle regiments, embattelled from the north fide of the water to the hill, but by turning ane narrow flanke of fex deep unto the enemy, againft common fenfe, and in doing thereof, that fame tyme that fliould have been loft drawing up upon the hill in the ground defigned unto them, fhould lykwife have been loft, or rather more, at their imbattelling upon the water- fide. Befides, they fliould have been obliedged to have wheeled once to the right hand, and when they had come into the ground, againe to the left hand, which had been a motion of great diffi- cultie in that rough and unequal! ground ; wherefore my order wes, (as I efteem it,) abfolutely the beft, if it have your Honours approbation, that our battell which fronted to the enemy, and wes to march off to the right hand, fliould by the feverall regi- ments face to the right hand, making the flanck the front ; ib that even upon our march, the faceing again to the left hand fliould have put us in our former pofture and battell, if the

enemy had attacked us on that way. Thirdly, It is (aid, I did neither give word nor figne. Whereunto I anfwer, At our

h'rll imbattellmg it wes not yet tyme ; then we faw no enemy but the outer guard, neither wes it refolved to fight, bot moll men thought the rebells were marching welt. After we left our ground, we had not tyme to imbattell compleatlie ; which Souldattis thinks neceH'arie to be done before the givin- of

O C5 word or figne, neither had it been poffible to have given them

unto all the regiments in ane poynt of time. Farder, it cannot be alleadged, that the want of them made us lofle the day, or that by the enemies figne we could not be knowne one from another. No; thewantofpoyntsofformalitiewesnotthecaufeofthemif- fortouns of that day ; bot God, for our other fmns, did fuffer us to fall before our enemies, whereof the only meane and occafion is only probable to have been our removeing from that ground whereon we flood firfl imbattelled, being foe near ane enemie who had fundrie advantages of us.

So by this and my former paper, your Honours may judge of my walking in your fervice fince my dimiffion ; and if there be yet any that defires ane accompt of the difpofition of things, and the many miffortouns of the countrey, whille I wes in charge, I (hall not fhelter myfelfe with that approbation given at Stirling and Perth, bot fliall endeavour to fatiffie your defire, by deducing unto yow of new, and in particular, how little I wes enabled for per- forming fo great fervice as wes required of me, and let yow fee my care to have preferved your forces when little could have been atcheived with them, in regard both of their numbers, of the fea- fon, and of the places where the enemy wes to be found ; and, lafl of all, I am confident your Honors fliall perceave, that the lofles at Innerlochie, Aldearne, and Alfoord, were not procured neither through my negligence nor counfell.

I being informed, that thefe Noblemen by whom your forces were accompanied, while in obedience to your Honours defyre I waited upon them after my dimiffion, have given in to your Hon- ours a querie, In what capacitie they fliall be examined anent the miffortounes of that day at Killfyth ? And not knowing what can

be for the advantage, except it were that Noblemen, who by their birth and quality are members of the Eftate and Parliament, or the chiefe and prime officers of ane armie, are not fo much con- cerned in the countrey's good or evill, nor fo much to be charged for giving counfell in matters fo much concerning the publique,

armie, I leave to your Honours confideration, if the enemy had marched off, as moft men fuppofed, if this day I fliould have wanted accufers, either for treafon, or pultronrie in the higheft degree ; and that in confirmation of what had formerly been faid of me.

If nothing of all this can juftifie my procedure, I will intreat your Honours to advert, that the Eftates defire to me wes to com- mand as of before ; and of before, the great Committee of Eftates declared, they remitted the carrying on of the warre to the Mar- quefs Argyle, Earle Crawfurd, and myfelfe, which fliall be quali- fied upon your Honours demand.

Soe being confident that what I have faid fliall be taken into your Honours ferious thoughts, I recommend unto your confidera- tion, whether or not thefe Noblemen's depofitions fliould be taken, as members of that great Committee to whom the affaires of the Kingdorne wes intrufled, and dayly confulters with me in all things of confequence concerning the Armie, whofe advyce and counfell I wes obliedged to take, in whatfoever capacity ; or if on that unhappie day only, whereon all mifcarried, they are not to be thought on in that qualitie they had been in formerly with me, and from the beginning in profperous times.

1646. LETTKKS AND JOURNALS. 425

PERTH, STH AUGUST 1645.

ACT FOR MANAGEING OF THE WARRE.

" THE Eltates of Parliament, etc. after hearing of the report

made by the Committee for manageing of the Warre, and after de-

bateing thereupon, and publick voiceing in the Houfe, doe enact, ftatute, and ordaine, that the directing of the Warre mall be by the Parliament, or Committee of Parliament ; and the actuall manage- ing and executeing of the directions to be by the Commander- in-chiefe, as he will be anfwerable to the Parliament or their Committee." Extract, etc.

This Act doth qualifie the neceffitie of a Committee goeing along

with the armie ; and I doubt not bot your Honours mall find it,

without controverfie, that, by this Act, nothing belonging to the Warre is left to the Commander-in-chiefe except the difcipline, which does chieflie confifl in ordering of the march, the quarter, and the battell. The manageing of the Warre, and the directions, are folely intruded to thefe of the great Committee, whofe direc- tions the Comrnander-in-chiefe is to execute ; and therefore, I hope, I cannot be condemned for confulting and advyfeing with fuch of them as were with me, I being without commiffion ; and I will leave to your Honours confideration, how it mould have fuited with the truft repofed in them, and their dutie to the countrey and caufe, if, upon any occafion, they mould either have refuted, or

though by me it had not been required. ( )

[WILLIAM BAILLIE.]

9 In Baillie's MS. there is added to this Vindication a paper dated at War- ()

rington 19th August 1648. It is an Attestation by several Officers in favour of General Baillie, shewing the necessity he was under of capitulating with Oliver Cromwell, after the defeat of the Duke of Hamilton's army at Preston, on the IBthofthatmonth. ItincludesacopyoftheCapitulation,andwillheinserted in the Third Volume of this work

forborne, to have given their faithfull and bell counfell, yea, even 9

VOL. 11.

PERTH, 4th AUGUST 1645.

ACT OF APPROBATION TO LIEUTENNENT-GENERAL WILLIAM BAYLIE.

" THE whilk day, the Lord Lieutennent-General William Baylie, haveing earneftly defired the Honourable Eftates of Par- liament to examine his former carriage in the late truft laid upon him, and thereafter to be pleafed to liberat him, and" to imploy fome other in that charge, finds, that he deferves thanks and ap-

424f

and againe renewes the late Acl made and doe alfo liberat him from that charge, and accepts of his dimiflion ; hot, in the mean tyme, de- fires him to continue in the fervice as of before, untill the eight

day of September next." Extract, etc.

THE whilk day, the Lord Lieutennent-General William Baylie, haveing earneftly defired the Honourable Eftates of Par- liament to examine his former carriage in the late truft laid upon him, and thereafter to be pleafed to liberat him, and" to imploy fome other in that charge, finds, that he deferves thanks and ap-

424f

and againe renewes the late Acl made and doe alfo liberat him from that charge, and accepts of his dimiflion ; hot, in the mean tyme, de- fires him to continue in the fervice as of before, untill the eight

day of September next." Extract, etc.

probation for his carriage ;

at for that effecl Stirling

;

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