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Raveneau and Laurens de Graaf
Oct 11, '20
2

Setting Sail





There was no question to be made, but I could find a Captain that would receive me; and I was not long in making the Choice, since there was not many of them at that time to pitch upon. Laurence de Graff was the Man I most fancied, who would make a special Corsair; and tho he had not been long arrived, all that he wanted, was to be gone as well as I. We were in a few hours time well satisfied with each other, and became such Friends, as those are wont to be, who are about to run the same Rifque of Fortune, and apparently to die together. This last indeed we should have reckoned upon with most appearance of Reason, but it was what we least thought of. My Departure took up all my Thoughts, I furnished my self with Arms and other small Necessaries, at the Charge of Monsieur de Franquesnay, who was very ready to advance me some Money, which I have paid him since, and whose kindness I shall never forget. At last the day came, and I must freely say, it was, in my Opinion, one of the best in the Course of my Life. On the 22d, of November, in the Year 1684. we departed from Pettit- Guaves, on the Coast of St. Domingo, to the number of 120 Men on Board a Prize taken some time before by Captain Laurence de Graff, from the Spaniards, which they sent as an Advice-boat from Carthagena on the Terra Firma of America, to Spain.

Our Design was to go and joyn our selves with a Fleet of Free-Booters, which we were in hopes to meet with before the Havana, a great City in the Isle of Cuba to the North, and about fourteen Leagues distant from St. Domingo.

We anchored on the 4th of December at the Tortoise Island to take in Water, and on the 6th sailed away in order to return to the Coast of St. Domingo, which is but Three Leagues off, and where we arrived the 12th, casting Anchor at Cape Francis, where we took in our full Store of Water and Wood. We left this Place on the 17th, and were taken with a North- wind two Leagues from the Road in such a manner, that we lost our Shalloop, which was too big to be put upon our Gibbet. Towards Evening we sailed back to a Place of Safety, where we were obliged to stay Two Days waiting for a Canoe we had sent to buy at the Cape, from whence we came, such things as we wanted for making up the Loss of our Chaloop.

On the twentieth we made ready to endeavour to rejoyn the Victorious, a Ship that came within from the Cape, belonging to Nantes, and bound to the Isles of the Wind, which had on Board the Commander of St. Laurence, Lieutenant-General of the French Islands and the Coasts of the Terra Firma of America, and Monsieur Begon Intendant of Justice Policy, and the Finances of that Countrey, to who we served as Convoy, left they should have been attacked by the Spanish Pirogues that Cruise thereabout. And indeed we had a great deal of Reason to be concerned for the Safety of those Gentlemen who were in much Esteem with all the Colonies of these Islands, because of the good Orders they kept, the exact Justice they administred, and the Tranquility the People enjoyed under them; but we could not possibly set sight on this Ship, as not knowing wha• Course she steer'd.

The three and twentieth we steer'd our own Course and in the Evening discovered a Ship to Leeward of us, to whom we gave Chase, but she braced to wait for us; and when we were come up her, we found it was Captain le Suer of Deep, who commanded a Flute called the Amerantha, whom quickly left, keeping our own Course. But on the Five and twentieth, which was Christmas-day, we has a great Calm till next day, when the Wind proving contrary, obliged us to put back to the Port Platta, on the Coast of St. Domingo, where we to the end of the Month.

On the First of Ianuary in the New Year, 1685 we doubled Cape St. Francis, and next day by in the Morning did the same by Cape Cabrott, we doubled that of Savona towards Noon, they being all scituated on the same Coast, and that day one of our Men died.

On the Fourth we sailed in sight of la Mona, next day coasted the Isle of Puerto Rico, and la Savona and then steered South-East and by South, till the Eleventh, when we discovered the Isles, of Ave, to-towards which we bore till the Evening, and doubled them on the Twelfth about Eleven in the Morning, keeping still the same Course till we came to the Isle de la Roca; where there was also another Rendezvous of our Men of War to be, which we were going to seek out.

On the Thirteenth, at Seven in the Morning, we discovered the main Land of America, and were becalmed next Day, which continued to the Fifteenth at Noon, when we had a fresh Gale, and steered North North-East till the Seventeenth, when about Moon-setting we descry'd Two Ships and Four Boats to Windward of us, about a Cannon-Shot's Distance, that had the Cape of us, which brought us upon Deck to make all ready.

One of those Boats on the Eighteenth by break of Day, being a Tartane commanded by Captain John Rose, as not knowing us presently, came up and halted us; and as our Captain had a Commission from the Lord High Admiral of France, the Count of Thoulouse, we made answer from Paris, and put out our Flag; But Rose who would not know us so, believing we had no other Intention in feigning our selves to be a King's Ship, than to get clear off him, gave Two Guns to make us strike, insomuch that taking him really for a Spaniard, we knocked out the Head of Two Barrels of Powder, in order to burn our selves, and blow up the Ship, rather than fall into the Hands of those People, who never gave us Quarter, but were wont to make us suffer all imaginable Torments, they beginning usually with the Captain, whom they hang with his Commission about his Neck: But one of the Two Ships came up with us in a Moment, and knowing what we were, gave us a Signal, which was so much the more Satisfaction to us, that instead of Enemies, which we took them to be, they proved to be not only Friends, but those very Ships we were in quest of, which obliged us to put in at the Cape, and spend that Day to visit one another.

One of these Two Ships belonged to Captain Michael Landresson, and was called The Mutinous, but formerly The Peace; and the other to Captain Laurence

Laurent de Graff





Laurens Cornelis Boudewijn de Graaf (c. 1653, Dordrecht, Dutch Republic – 24 May 1704, Cap-Français, Saint-Domingue) was a Dutch pirate, mercenary, and naval officer in the service of the French colony of Saint-Domingue during the late 17th and early 18th century.

He was also known as Laurencillo or Lorencillo or simply El Griffe (Spanish), Sieur de Baldran or simply Laurent de Graff (French) and Gesel van de West (Dutch; "Scourge of the West"). Henry Morgan, the governor of Jamaica, characterized him as "a great and mischievous pirate". De Graaf was described as tall, blond, mustached and handsome. Some Spanish thought he was the Devil in person.



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurens_de_Graaf

The Fiddler on the Deck

Song by Santiano


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHla01hiCqc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HLiBtbH11o

Now he's the one who sings while the lubbers scrub the floor

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

And he's the one who laughs when the storm begins to roar

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

When his fiddle starts to play, better hide away

If you don't wanna die

He is the one to blame when a mate goes overboard

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care and be aware, he's like a cutlass in your back

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care, he's everywhere, he's like a needle in your neck

He's the fiddler on this wreck

I'm the fiddler on the deck

He's dancing in the tops when the ship goes down the drain

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

And he's the reason why when me mateys go insane

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

When he plays a fiddle tune, better catch him soon

Or wave the world goodbye

He is the one to blame when the devil calls your name

(Oh my, oh my, oh my)

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care and be aware, he's like a cutlass in your back

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care, he's everywhere, he's like a needle in your neck

He's the fiddler on this wreck

I'm the fiddler on the deck

Hey!

Hey!

Hey!

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care and be aware, he's like a cutlass in your back

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care, he's everywhere, he's like a needle in your neck

He's the fiddler on this wreck

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care and be aware, he's like a cutlass in your back

He's the fiddler, he's the fiddler, he's the fiddler on the deck

Better take care, he's everywhere, he's like a needle in your neck

He's the fiddler on this wreck

I'm the fiddler on the deck

Hey

Songwriters: Frank Ramond / Hartmut Krech / Lukas Hainer / Mark Nissen




Xxxx

Oct 11, '20
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