Re-Send Password?
Roland Garros
Mar 06, '21
0

Roland Garros (aviator)

Eugène Adrien Roland Georges Garros (French pronunciation: ​[ʁɔlɑ̃ ɡaʁos]; 6 October 1888 – 5 October 1918) was a French pioneering aviator and fighter pilot during World War I and early days of aviation. In 1928, the Roland Garros tennis stadium was named in his memory; the French Open tennis tournament takes the name of Roland-Garros from the stadium in which it is held.






Biography

Eugène Adrien Roland Georges Garros was born in Saint-Denis, Réunion, and studied at the Lycée Janson de Sailly and HEC Paris.

At the age of 12, he contracted pneumonia, and was sent to Cannes to recuperate. He took up cycling to restore his health, and went on to win an inter-school championship in the sport. He was also keen on football, rugby and tennis. When he was 21 he started a car dealership in Paris. He was a close friend of Ettore Bugatti and in 1913 became the first owner of Garros Bugatti Type 18, later christened Black Bess by its second owner, British racing driver Ivy Cummings, which survives today at the Louwman Museum in the Netherlands.








Aviation

During his summer holiday in 1909, at Sapicourt near Reims, staying with a friend's uncle, he saw the Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne which ran from 22 to 29 August. After this, he knew he had to be an aviator.

He started his aviation career in 1909 flying a Demoiselle (dragonfly) monoplane, an aircraft that flew well only if it had a small lightweight pilot. He gained Ae.C.F. licence no. 147 in July 1910.








In 1911 Garros graduated to flying Blériot XI monoplanes and entered a number of European air races with this type of aircraft, including the 1911 Paris to Madrid air race and the Circuit of Europe (Paris–London–Paris), in which he came second.

On 4 September 1911, he set an altitude record of 3,950 m (12,960 ft). The following year, on 6 September 1912, after Austrian aviator Philipp von Blaschke had flown to 4,360 m (14,300 ft), he regained the height record by flying to 5,610 m (18,410 ft).

Epic Journey

By 1913 he was flying the faster Morane-Saulnier monoplanes, and on 23 September gained fame for making the first non-stop flight across the Mediterranean Sea from Fréjus-Saint Raphaël in the south of France to Bizerte in Tunisia in a Morane-Saulnier G.








The flight commenced at 5:47 am and lasted for nearly eight hours, during time which Garros resolved two engine malfunctions. The following year, Garros joined the French army at the outbreak of World War I.








Captured

On 18 April 1915, Garros was hit by ground fire, and he came down in German-controlled territory where he failed to destroy his aircraft before being captured, and the intact gun and armoured propeller. Fokker had been working on a system for at least six months before Garros's aircraft fell into German hands, but this convinced the German military to request a similar mechanism.

With the Fokker's introduction of an interrupter gear, the tables were turned on the Allies, with Fokker's aircraft shooting down many Allied aircraft, leading to what became known as the Fokker Scourge.

POW camp internment and escape

After almost three years in captivity in various German POW camps Garros managed to escape on 14 February 1918 together with fellow aviator lieutenant Anselme Marchal. They made it to London via the Netherlands and from there he returned to France where he rejoined the French army. He settled into Escadrille 26 to pilot a SPAD, and claimed two victories on 2 October 1918, one of which was confirmed.

Death

On 5 October 1918, he was shot down and killed near Vouziers, Ardennes, a month before the end of the war and one day before his 30th birthday. His adversary was probably German ace Hermann Habich from Jasta 49, flying a Fokker D.VII.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roland_Garros_(aviator)https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/eugene-adrien-roland-georges-garros/https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/occitanie/gers/une-replique-de-l-avion-de-roland-garros-traverse-la-mediterranee-cent-ans-apres-l-exploit-de-l-aviateur-reunionnais-323045.html

Frequency and Resonance

“Pip”

I first knew “Pip” in 1984 when he came to the University of Newcastle upon Tyne and was in my Hall of Residence (Freeman Hall) Castle Leazes known to us as “Leazditz Castle” after Colditz form WW2!

He is life long friend and past life brother of mine. He is an excellent automotive mechanic, superb sportsman, taught Physical Education and Science, excellent at Rugby, football, squash, tennis, swimming, an ardent cyclist, horticulturist, travelled the World and loves Aircraft especially Spitfires and Lancaster bombers.










https://www.ravenecho.com/articles/3/556/https://www.ravenecho.com/articles/46/561/

Flt Lt R C Hay DFC

Dambuster Raid and Beyond

Aged 30, with a wife and daughter back in Australia, Bob Hay was slightly older than the rest of Micky Martin’s crew. Born in Renmark, South Australia on 4 November 1913, Robert Claude Hay was the son of John and Margaret Hay. He attended Renmark High School and graduated from Roseworthy Agricultural College in 1935, where he also excelled in sports. The college swimming pool is now named in his honour.

The Death of Bob Hay

Eventually Martin managed to land his battered Lancaster in Sardinia, on a small airfield run by the Americans. Hay’s body was removed from the aircraft and he was buried the next day in a cemetery in Cagliari.


A Curious Coincidence

Hay was killed where Garros took off on his epic journey across the Mediterranean Sea for Tunis and following the same route in Hay’s death, as his soul did in Garros’ life!


Several months passed until February 1944 when, under Cheshire’s leadership, a detachment set off to bomb the Antheor Viaduct in southern France, an important rail link to Italy. 
Paul Brickhill devotes a whole chapter of The Dam Busters to what happened to Martin’s crew on this operation describing in vivid detail his bombing run and the way the aircraft rocked as it was hit by a cannon shell which exploded in the ammunition tray under the front turret.

Martin was calling the roll round his crew. The tough little Foxlee was all right. Bob Hay did not answer. Whittaker gave him a twisted grin, swearing and hunched, holding his legs. The rest were all right. He called Hay twice more but there was only silence, so he said ‘Toby, see if Bob’s all right. His intercom must be busted.’ Foxlee swung out of his turret and wormed towards the nose. He lifted his head towards Martin. ‘He’s lying on the floor. Not moving.’ (The Dam Busters, pp154-5.)

Eventually Martin managed to land his battered Lancaster in Sardinia, on a small airfield run by the Americans. Hay’s body was removed from the aircraft and he was buried the next day in a cemetery in Cagliari. He was the only one of Martin’s Dams Raid crew who did not survive the war. Martin was himself quite shaken by the episode, and did not fly again on operations with 617 Squadron. A few months later, however, he had recovered his poise and was back in a Mosquito squadron.





Frequency and Resonance

“Pip”

I first knew “Pip” in 1984 when he came to the University of Newcastle upon Tyne and was in my Hall of Residence (Freeman Hall) Castle Leazes known to us as “Leazditz Castle” after Colditz form WW2!

He was studying for a BSc Hons in Agricultural Plant Science, Faculty of Agriculture. He was the life and soul of our gang!

Come the second year we had to look for other accommodation. Hen Frank and Pip were looking for a fourth person to share so I joined them. I quickly found out that I was sharing a room with Pip. We became lifelong friends and still are.

As I was year older we became brothers. Many fond memories followed: the most relevant was coming back after particularly “heavy session” up the Chillingham Arms (Now called The Chillingham!) in Heaton Pip decided to play some music on his giant Pair of Wharfedale Audio Speakers! The vinyl record was World War Two Movie themes when it got to the “Dam Busters March” we found ourselves with the sofa up turned, the clothes horse as a cockpit cover and a wooden floor brush as the front gun!

Hen was the Pilot, me as co-pilot, Pip as front gunner and Frank as top gunner. We used beer glasses to mimic the sound of of inflight microphones.

It was so loud the neighbour across the street banged our door to complain!

Pip and I visited the Möhnesee Dam February 1985 when I was living in Verl, Gütersloh.

It was the week of half term;

Bewegliche Feiertage:

Rosenmontag: Montag, 18. Februar 1985

Faschingsdienstag: Dienstag, 19. Februar 1985

.....and his 30 birthday the 25. February 1985!






https://www.ravenecho.com/articles/30/556/

Xxxx

Mar 06, '21
152
0
No Comments Available
Raven Echo © 2010 - 2021
Founded by Ian Ballie PHD
Designed by Jay Graham